Starting a quiz league

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Jockosaurus
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Starting a quiz league

Postby Jockosaurus » Sat Aug 03, 2013 11:38 pm

Hi Quizzers

I'm hoping to get a quiz league started in Brisbane. Any tips appreciated!

cheers,
Jockosaurus

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Chris
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Re: Starting a quiz league

Postby Chris » Sun Aug 04, 2013 6:13 pm

Hiya,

Most of the leagues here feature divisions of 8 teams - this makes for a 14 week league season with home & away games. Teams are typically four a side, but I have heard of 5 or 6 where the entire quiz is a consultation/team format (see below).

Most leagues play 8-10 rounds of questions, the majority of these as team/consultation rounds. Typically only 2 or 3 of the rounds will see individuals asked questions in turn. All-individual quizzes are a minority (I only know Merseyside and London playing this format) since it scares-off some newbies. People don't like to be stood in a spotlight, so to speak, if they fear they might give a daft answer.

Your hardest task is likely to be getting teams to commit to participating each week (remembering home teams will need a reader, and possibly scorer too), and then getting their subs/league fees off them timeously. It can help if the venue a team plays from is happy to sponsor the team to the tune of their subs, plus some sandwiches/eats on home nights. The pay-off for the venue is, hopefully, lots of extra people in the place to buy drinks - in the UK, quiz league games take place almost exclusively in pubs/social clubs.

One league I know of which was struggling - as they lost teams season on season - decided to go for a league-get together series. Here all teams would gather together at a mutual venue to play the quiz as a 'table contest', e.g. all questions read out for ALL teams to attempt a written answer to. Points awarded according to where they finished on the night. It worked for them and may just have saved their League. And it removes the hassle of organising fixture lists, and distributing questions etc..

Perhaps the way to start is to host some quiz nights for teams, foster a spirit of competition, and perhaps include the odd head-to-head encounter between the two top scoring sides on the night, and then gauge if there's a wider appetite for this sort of thing?

Do keep us posted as to how you are doing and feel free to ask more questions, specific or general.
Chris Jones
Director, Quizzing Ltd., BQA and iQa

Jockosaurus
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Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:37 pm
Location: Australia

Re: Starting a quiz league

Postby Jockosaurus » Sun Aug 04, 2013 11:43 pm

Thanks for your input Chris. I agree a couple of head-to-head friendlies is the best way to get things started. A few more questions:

* Other than word of mouth, what's a good publicity method?
* What fees do leagues typically charge?
* How do you ensure that quizmasters / scorers turn up? What happens if they don't?

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Chris
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Re: Starting a quiz league

Postby Chris » Mon Aug 05, 2013 1:24 pm

Hiya,

In reply to your questions...

* Other than word of mouth, what's a good publicity method?

Hmm, get into any local pub chain and see if you can get their sales managers involved. They have the network and can perhaps target those bars/pubs with an existing 'quiz culture'. Also, perhaps see if the local newspaper(s)/radio etc. are interested in doing a piece on you and your efforts to get a league going.

* What fees do leagues typically charge?

Leagues normally get their questions bought-in, or pay members to sit out matches having set questions for a particular week. The Derbyshire League I play in pay £45 a set to writers and charge teams something like £70 a season (circa 20 weeks, including cup games).

* How do you ensure that quizmasters / scorers turn up? What happens if they don't?

Travelling teams sometimes have supernumeraries with them and most games being played in good spirit, such people will often be amenable to helping. However, the bottom line is it's the responsibility of the home team to supply a reader (teams themselves can keep a check on scores, if needs be) and if they don't have one they will have to give up a player to fulfill that role. If they have to play a 'man' short, that's what they have to do. So, teams need to make sure they apply whatever pressure/offer inducements to ensure their reader turns up. In practice most established teams will have a squad, and a rota by which each take a turn in sitting out to read etc..
Chris Jones
Director, Quizzing Ltd., BQA and iQa


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